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Don’t Give Up on Mental Health Treatment

Capt. Anthony A. Arita, Deployment Health Clinical Center director

Capt. Anthony A. Arita, Deployment Health Clinical Center director

Posted by Myron J. Goodman, DCoE Public Affairs on May 14, 2015

It’s not a sprint, it’s a marathon. If you’ve had a coach, personal trainer, inspirational teacher, or a really motivational friend, there is a good chance you heard them say something similar. Most likely, they said this to you because they wanted to encourage you to keep working toward your goal – whatever it was.

A senior military leader, and psychologist, has a similar hope – he wants service members to stick with mental health treatment and give it a chance to work even if they don’t see immediate progress.

According to Capt. Anthony A. Arita, Deployment Health Clinical Center director and experienced clinical neuropsychologist, people who give up on treatment too soon rob themselves of the benefits of care. Many forms of psychotherapy require 10 to 12 sessions to achieve noticeable symptom reduction. If medications are prescribed, it can take several weeks to find the right medications and therapeutic dosages.

If it’s not working, talk to your provider

If you don’t think your treatment is working, or if you are unclear about your treatment options, share your concerns with your provider. You should feel comfortable asking your provider to explain your diagnosis, and treatment plan, in a way you understand.

“For treatment to have the most impact, it’s important patients actively participate in the recovery process, follow their treatment plan – including taking medications as prescribed and completing therapy homework – and meet with their providers regularly with limited breaks in care,” Arita said.

Don’t expect a quick fix; recovery takes time, especially when patients have co-occurring conditions, such as alcohol or substance abuse, traumatic brain injury or chronic pain.

“Most people who persevere with treatment can expect very positive results,” Arita said.

It sounds like a lot of work; maybe I don’t really need it

If you think ignoring your medical conditions will make them go away, think again. Not taking your health seriously or choosing to do nothing may make things worse.

“Some people assume that forgoing medical treatment for severe psychological conditions, like posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), won’t matter – this is simply not true,” Arita said. “Without proper care any medical condition can get worse and negatively affect many aspects of a person’s life.”

It may affect my career

Some service members don’t seek treatment because they fear it will hurt their careers. Although it is true that a severe medical condition — physical or psychological — may affect a person’s fitness for duty, according to Arita, participating in treatment or receiving a mental health diagnosis doesn’t automatically impact one’s status.

“The important thing to know is that treatment does work, so keep at it,” Arita said. “In most cases, people recover from symptoms and return to optimal readiness – and that’s what we really want for our service members.”

Not sure where to go for help? The DCoE Outreach Center is available 24/7 to connect you with resources and help in your area. Call 866-966-1020, email resources@dcoeoutreach.org or live chat at realwarriors.net/livechat.

Twitter:
Recovery requires persistence: don’t give up on your #mentalhealth treatment #MHAmonth

Facebook:
“Most people who persevere with treatment can expect very positive results.”

Deployment Health Clinical Center Director Capt. Anthony Arita emphasizes the importance of not giving up on #mentalhealth treatment. #MHAmonth

http://www.dcoe.mil/blog/15-05-14/Don_t_Give_Up_on_Mental_Health_Treatment.aspx

This November 2014 Hidden Wounds to partner with Sweat by Jamie Scott Fitness

JSweatUSLOGO

 

If you don’t know what Sweat by JSF is then let us help.
SWEAT offers a full-body, indoor-cycling workout that will change the way you think about “cardio.” The instructor will have you moving and working to the beat of the music so your mind and body remain engaged.

Unlike traditional cycling classes, added movements will work your shoulders, triceps, biceps, abs and obliques all while your lower body continuously cycles. The result is a calorie-torching, body-toning workout that feels more like a party.

You can rest assured that SWEAT instructors are the best at what they do, trained to lead these unique classes safely, effectively and always with personal attention given to all levels of riders.

Here is the press release as to what we have planned this November.

We are all touched by the dedication men and women make to our country every day in order for us to live in freedom and thrive in the United States.  How often do we really stop to think about those soldiers and veterans? It’s time we do.

Many of them walk among us after returning home and while they may seem ok, underneath they are suffering. They are suffering “an invisible war at home.” This war is known as PTSD.  Based in Columbia, SC, Hidden Wounds, a non-profit organization, works to provide peace and comfort for military personnel suffering from combat stress injuries such as PTSD, TBI and other psychological post war challenges.  SWEAT by JSF has been given the privilege to work with this organization during the month of November to honor our veterans. This partnership will bring awareness to the horrific physical and emotional injuries that come with war. We ride for those who cannot, and we ride to help those who have protected our freedoms.

We invite you to join SWEAT and Hidden Wounds in November every Friday at 4pm.  Your workout will be for more than just you…it will be for our veterans.  For without them, we would not have the freedom to ride!

 

 

All proceeds from the November Friday rides will benefit Hidden Wounds

 

SWEAT by JSF – 1125 Lady Street – Columbia, SC 29201- 803.764.7984 sweat@jamiescottfitness.com

Young war veteran shot, killed by police

WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL
By WMCActionNews5.com Staff – email

GERMANTOWN, TN –

(WMC) – A young war veteran was shot and killed by Germantown police officers Tuesday night just before 10 p.m.

Justin Neil Davis’ best friend, who asked to be called Val, told WMC Action News 5 that Davis went to Cameron Brown Park in Germantown off Farmington Boulevard, because it is where he had happy memories of his childhood.
Davis was reportedly sitting in his car with a rifle and thoughts of suicide when Germantown police shot and killed him. Wednesday night, family and friends say they still have questions. 

According to police, a “be on the lookout” or BOLO alert was issued for Davis, 24, who was reportedly unstable, armed and dangerous, and possibly suicidal.

Fayette County Sheriff’s Office received a tip on a crisis hotline about Davis. Fayette County deputies went to his house, but he was not there. That’s when Germantown police found Davis in a parked car at Cameron Brown Park armed with a rifle.

“I tried to get him to come out to my parents house … just to meet him somewhere just to talk him out of it,” Val said.
Val says while he texted Davis, law enforcement officers were tracking the Iraqi veteran on his cell phone, but that he was not allowed to talk with his friend.

Officers evacuated the immediate area around the park and established communication with him using the squad car’s PA system.

According to police, the situation escalated, and three Germantown police officers ended up firing their guns at Davis. He was pronounced dead at the park.

Investigators used orange paint to mark where Davis’ car and six police cars sat during the confrontation. The closest police car appears to have been about 20 yards away.

“Why did three cops have to unload their weapon on a single man?” Val said.

Davis’ friends and family say he was a war veteran who had trouble getting a job when he got home. They say he did not deserve to die this way.

“It’s just sad that people have to feel like they can’t help themselves and things go bad that way, you know?” Germantown resident Kelsey Beckum said.

The three GPD officers involved in the shooting are on paid administrative leave pending an investigation. The district attorney’s office asked Tennessee Bureau of Investigation to lead the case; the TBI would eventually turn it back over to the DA’s office.

Copyright 2014 WMC Action News 5. All rights reserved.   

http://www.waff.com/story/26034113/man-shot-killed-by-germantown-police-officers?clienttype=generic&mobilecgbypass&utm_content=bufferf9b50&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

Iraq war vet introduces military suicide bill

By Ashley Fantz, CNN

The first Iraq war combat veteran to serve in the U.S. Senate introduced legislation on Thursday aimed at reducing the number of military veterans who commit suicide. No matter the cost of the measures urged in the sweeping bill, “that is the cost of war,” Democratic Sen. John Walsh of Montana told CNN.

Every day, 22 veterans commit suicide.

To Walsh, that is more than a number. From 2004 to 2005, he commanded an infantry battalion of the Montana National Guard in Iraq. When the unit returned home, one of Walsh’s soldiers committed suicide.

When Walsh became adjutant general of the Montana National Guard, a few more guardsmen died by suicide.

“Far too often, we’re leaving our veterans to fight their toughest battles alone,” Walsh said. “Returning home from combat does not erase what happened there, and yet red tape and government dysfunction have blocked access to the care that saves lives. It is our duty to come together for real solutions for our heroes,” Walsh told CNN on Thursday.

The Suicide Prevention for America’s Veterans Act is collaboration between Walsh and the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America. Founded in 2004, IAVA is the first and largest organization for new veterans and their families, with 270,000 members nationwide.

The next step for Walsh is to get a co-sponsor for the bill. He said he’s already received bipartisan support behind the scenes.

The veterans organization is working on getting a similar bill in the House, said IAVA political director Kate O’Gorman.

What’s in the bill?

Among the bill’s key objectives is to give veterans more time to receive mental health treatment.

Currently, when a service member separates from active duty — whether they are transitioning to being a veteran or becoming a Reservist or a member of the National Guard — they have five years to receive care from the Department of Veterans Affairs, O’Gorman said. Sometimes it can take longer than five years for service members and veterans to realize they’re experiencing the symptoms of Post Traumatic Stress and other mental injuries.

About 25% of IAVA’s members, O’Gorman said, have experienced a delayed onset of PTSD after getting out of the service.

Many times, five years is just not long enough for veterans who are dealing with the stigma of mental health issues. It can take many years to emotionally come to grips with the diagnosis alone, and then it takes time to find and receive the right care.

To address that, Walsh’s bill would extend the time to receive mental health treatment from five years to 15 years.

The legislation also seeks to improve the quality of mental health care providers by making their jobs more competitive with the private sector, O’Gorman said. Right now there are more than 1,000 open jobs at the VA for mental health care jobs, including psychiatric nurses, physician assistants and psychiatrists, among others, she said.

The bill will introduce a pilot initiative that would allow a student to have their loans repaid if they work for the VA, O’Gorman said.
It also calls for annual reviews of care programs within the Defense Department and the VA to ensure resources are being used effectively to help service members and vets struggling with mental health issues.

Further, the legislation points out that the VA and the Defense Department use two different computer systems and mandates that those systems be amended so that they speak to each other more seamlessly.

The legislation would also try to streamline the way the Pentagon and the VA prescribe medication. Currently, they use different drug prescription protocols, Walsh and military experts told CNN, and that can create a difficult situation.

For example, a service member overcomes the hurdle of admitting they need care, seeks help from a DOD doctor and, after several tries, gets on a drug that works for him or her.

When that warrior become a veteran, they go to a VA doctor only to be told that the drug the DOD doctor gave them is not available under VA protocols.

The bill was introduced the same week that Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America held its annual Storm the Hill initiative. Teams comprised of four veterans whoses live have been rocked by a fellow warrior’s suicide met with lawmakers in Washington. The veterans shared their stories, and implored those in power to do something substantial to address the problem.

Dollar costs and mental costs

It’s unclear how much it would cost to do everything the bill lays out, according to Andrea Helling, Walsh’s spokeswoman. Walsh is waiting for the Congressional Budget Office to provide a figure, she said.

But the senator stressed that it will cost far more in years to come if changes are not made soon to improve mental health care.

The legislation comes at a time of fierce belt tightening in the armed forces. In February, the Pentagon said it would reduce the size of the Army to pre-Word War II numbers, retire the a popular A-10 “Warhog” attack jet and reduce some benefits for warriors.

“This is a budget that recognizes the reality of the magnitude of our fiscal challenges, the dangerous world we live in, and the American military’s unique and indispensable role in the security of this country and in today’s volatile world,” Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel said in February.

“There are difficult decisions ahead,” he said. “That is the reality we’re living with.”

Downsizing due to modernization and budget constraints began under Hagel’s predecessor, Robert Gates.

The Iraq and Afghanistan wars are the longest continuous battles the United States has fought.

The Iraq war lasted from 2003 to 2010 and Afghanistan has been raging since soon after the September 11, 2001, terror attacks. President Barack Obama has said that the United States could withdraw all troops from Afghanistan by the end of 2014.

More than 2 million Americans have served in combat in those two wars. Researchers estimate that as many as 300,000 service members may meet criteria for PTSD and between 200,000 and 300,000 have suffered a traumatic brain injury from mild to severe, according to Dr. Stephen Cozza with the Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress.

The nonprofit think-tank RAND Corporation estimates a third of veterans likely have TBI, PTSD or depression, which puts the overall number affected at around 600,000.
A large body of research indicates PTSD is associated with increased likelihood of suicidal behavior.

Beyond the bill

A large body of research indicates PTSD is associated with increased likelihood of suicidal behavior.

Walsh was sworn into the U.S. Senate in January after Montana Gov. Steve Bullock named Walsh, his lieutenant governor, to serve the remainder of Sen. Max Baucus’ term after he became U.S. ambassador to China. Walsh is running for election in November.

Walsh’s legislation, IAVA’s O’Gorman told CNN, has bipartisan support. And the goal is to get it passed by Memorial Day, far before an election is a concern.

Walsh said lawmakers must also address suicides amongst military family members, too.

The Pentagon is currently not tracking the number of suicides among relatives. CNN recently explored the topic and spoke to dozens of relatives who said they had contemplated or attempted killing themselves.

Warrior suicides and military family member suicides are “connected,” Walsh said.

Speaking about a warrior under his command who had been deployed three times whose wife was left to care for triplets, Walsh said he understood that families have been under extreme stress for years.

The relatives have made “enormous sacrifices,” he said.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/03/27/politics/military-suicide-legislation/index.html?c=&page=>

$250K awarded to help Alabama Veterans suffering from PTSD

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David Lynch Foundation Announces $250,000 Grant to Teach Transcendental Meditation to Alabama Vets with PTSD.

Birmingham, Alabama, The David Lynch Foundation (DLF) has announced a $250,000 grant to provide Alabama veterans suffering from Post-Traumatic-Stress-Syndrome  (PTSD) an opportunity to learn Transcendental Meditation (TM).

The DLF was established by the film-maker David Lynch in 2005 to fund the implementation of scientifically proven stress-reducing techniques for those in need including, veterans with PTSD and their families;

John Harrod, Executive Director of the Alabama Transcendental Meditation Program and a full-time TM teacher, will host a presentation at the Hoover Library – Main Branch Wednesday evening March 5th at 6:30 P.M. P.M. to introduce the Alabama PTSD project and discuss the tremendous benefits TM brings to veterans with PTSD. Veterans who attend the events will be eligible to learn Transcendental Meditation at no cost.

“”Thousands of veterans with PTSD have already learned TM and it has been transformative” says Harrod.  “The U.S Government now spends between $ 4-6 billion dollars a year trying to help vets, but no treatment has proven widely effective.  Transcendental Meditation is extremely effective, and brings immediate and ongoing relief and benefits.”

A recent study published in the July 2013 issue of Military Magazine found the twice-daily practice of the Transcendental Meditation among vets with PTSD at Fort Gordon, Georgia markedly reduced symptoms of PTSD, some by as much as 50% in the first few weeks.

Last week, the Journal of Traumatic Stress announced the publication of a new scientific study showing that African war refugees who learned Transcendental Meditation experienced an immediate and dramatic reduction in PTS symptoms by as much as 90%.

Significant Reductions in Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms in Congolese Refugees Within 10 days of Transcendental Meditation Practice

And the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Veterans Administration is currently conducting a $2.4 million research study on TM as a treatment. The results of that research will be announced later this year.

“There are thousands of Alabama veterans who suffer with PTSD”, says Harrod. Meditation has come to the forefront as a something that works..  Vets say they get their lives back.  It’s simple to learn and to practice and all any vet has to do learn is to come to this presentation.

Anyone interested or wanting more information can also contact John Harrod at jharrod@tm.org or by phone at 250-979-7073.

Anyone wanting to learn more about TM and PTSD can go to www.tm.org and www.davidlynchfoundation.org

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Bush hosts summit on helping veterans transition

DALLAS (AP) — Efforts must be made to end the stigma attached to post-traumatic stress disorder, which can hinder military veterans’ transition into civilian life and employment, former President George W. Bush said Wednesday.

Addressing a summit at the George W. Bush Institute in Dallas, Bush said some veterans are reluctant to seek help and that employers often don’t realize the condition can be treated.

“As a result of public misunderstanding, employers sometimes cite it as a reason for not hiring vets,” Bush said.

“As most doctors today will tell you, post-traumatic stress is not a disorder. Post-traumatic stress or PTS is an injury that can result from the experience of war,” he said. “And like other injuries, PTS is treatable.”

Bush said his institute has been working with Syracuse University on a study of the issues affecting veterans who have served since 9/11. Bush said full results of the study will be released this spring and that the information will help employers understand what veterans have to offer, noting that both veterans and employers have a hard time translating military experience.

“You don’t see many job postings that say: ‘Wanted: Experience hunting insurgents and terrorists. Willing to risk life for co-workers,'” Bush said.

“Or what’s a veteran supposed to put down?” he asked. “My last office was a Humvee?”

He said that the institute will also work with higher education officials on how to recruit and retain veterans.

“We recognize that in helping our veterans we can unleash the potential of a generation of resourceful, determined and experienced leaders,” Bush said.

Jill Biden, wife of Vice President Joe Biden, also spoke at the summit that included panel discussions with former military leaders, business people and nonprofit leaders. Jill Biden and first lady Michelle Obama founded the Joining Forces campaign to rally the country around its servicemen and servicewomen.

“Our military families have done so much for our country and each of us can do something in return,” she said.

The summit is part of the institute’s Military Service Initiative, which has also hosted golf tournaments and mountain bike rides for those wounded while serving in the military. The institute is part of Bush’s presidential center on the campus of Southern Methodist University in Dallas.

Associated Press
Posted on February 20, 2014

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