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This November 2014 Hidden Wounds to partner with Sweat by Jamie Scott Fitness

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If you don’t know what Sweat by JSF is then let us help.
SWEAT offers a full-body, indoor-cycling workout that will change the way you think about “cardio.” The instructor will have you moving and working to the beat of the music so your mind and body remain engaged.

Unlike traditional cycling classes, added movements will work your shoulders, triceps, biceps, abs and obliques all while your lower body continuously cycles. The result is a calorie-torching, body-toning workout that feels more like a party.

You can rest assured that SWEAT instructors are the best at what they do, trained to lead these unique classes safely, effectively and always with personal attention given to all levels of riders.

Here is the press release as to what we have planned this November.

We are all touched by the dedication men and women make to our country every day in order for us to live in freedom and thrive in the United States.  How often do we really stop to think about those soldiers and veterans? It’s time we do.

Many of them walk among us after returning home and while they may seem ok, underneath they are suffering. They are suffering “an invisible war at home.” This war is known as PTSD.  Based in Columbia, SC, Hidden Wounds, a non-profit organization, works to provide peace and comfort for military personnel suffering from combat stress injuries such as PTSD, TBI and other psychological post war challenges.  SWEAT by JSF has been given the privilege to work with this organization during the month of November to honor our veterans. This partnership will bring awareness to the horrific physical and emotional injuries that come with war. We ride for those who cannot, and we ride to help those who have protected our freedoms.

We invite you to join SWEAT and Hidden Wounds in November every Friday at 4pm.  Your workout will be for more than just you…it will be for our veterans.  For without them, we would not have the freedom to ride!

 

 

All proceeds from the November Friday rides will benefit Hidden Wounds

 

SWEAT by JSF – 1125 Lady Street – Columbia, SC 29201- 803.764.7984 sweat@jamiescottfitness.com

Dr Nancy Brown, Helping Vets With Hidden Scars

Nancy Brown holds a photo of her son, Will Brown, now serving overseas

Nancy Brown holds a photo of her son, Will Brown, now serving overseas

Helping vets with hidden scars

By Jeff Stensland, stenslan@mailbox.sc.edu, 803-777-3686

Social work professor Nancy Brown vividly remembers driving to her house in Forest Acres after her son, Will, was deployed to Iraq in 2009. For months whenever she turned the final corner onto her street her heart would start racing and she would become filled with dread.

“I knew that if something were to happen to him there would be a strange car waiting in my driveway, and I always half-expected one would be there every time I turned that corner. So I didn’t want to turn that corner,” she said. “I called that the year of not sleeping.”

For Will, an Army reservist who came back safely from Iraq, home would never be quite the same either. Brown says her son intimated to her his nervousness about driving down streets on garbage pick-up day. The plastic recycling bins placed next to curbs reminded him of the roadside bombs he and his fellow soldiers would encounter in Iraq.

But Will would be alright. No longer on the front lines, he found a way to work through the stress of war and his degree in Russian and Arabic studies has landed him a job as a media consultant overseas. He also recently got married to a woman he met in Kyrgyzstan while studying Russian at the London School of Languages. Brown keeps a photo of him and his finance on her desk—a dashing young couple standing dockside on a bright summer day in an exotic port-of-call.

Others in the Brown’s lives would not be so lucky. Will’s best friend since eighth grade, Marine Lance Cpl. Mills Bigham, never could shake the hidden scars inflicted during his service in Iraq. Bigham’s shooting of a 12-year-old holding what turned out to be a shoddy grenade haunted him until he decided to end his own life in 2010. He was only 23.

Brown says she wishes she could have done more for Bigham while he was alive and admits that she struggled with bouts of guilt about his death.

“I would ask him how he was, and he would always say ‘fine,’ but he wasn’t,” she said. “War changes people.”

To help honor Bigham, Brown and a former colleague are creating a military social work program at USC that trains people in the community to identify when veterans are struggling with PTSD and equips with them with tools to help. USC also offers a certificate for master’s level social work students that covers issues of trauma, substance abuse and family relationships.

The community program now being developed is designed for social workers, health care professionals or anyone else who may have frequent interactions with veterans and their families. Along with Bigham’s family, Brown helps promote a non-profit called Hidden Wounds, which provides counseling to veterans and their families.

Suicide has become a major concern of the nation’s military. Among active duty troops, there was a record of 350 suicides in 2012, nearly twice as many as a decade before. And an estimated 22 veterans commit suicide each day, according to Department of Veterans Affairs.

Brown, who has spent more than three decades as a therapist and directs USC’s Drug and Addiction Studies Graduate Certificate Program, said the problem of PTSD may be especially difficult for reservists and National Guard member, who must quickly transition from combat situations back to office jobs in the civilian world.

“A lot of our vets are doing really well, and we have to acknowledge that,” she said. “But there are many others who the war has taken a big a big toll on and who are not having an easy time adapting back.”

Additional resources:

USC Counseling and Human Development Center at 803-777-5223

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255.

Veterans Crisis Line 1-800-273-8255

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